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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
to protect your device from the environment. that's generally where they've been used. colombia, thailand, maybe even in pakistan. so it is kind of odd that they would use that here in a domestic setting. but, again, they don't know -- they don't have any suspect at all. >> it's also important to point out that this is an investigation where all of the resources and intelligence community are being used and they will have a backlog of intelligence they have to go through, intercept, satellite intelligence, signal intelligence, which they can monitor all of this stuff in realtime. >> they can't. and from what they monitor on a daily basis, minute-by-minute basis, from known suspects around the world, they had zero indication from this event. now you go back based on what happened and what you do know, you check cell phone towers and those international conversations and run your traffic through suspicious groups around the world. just speaking to the boston law enforcement source, a federal source earlier today, and a sense of is it domestic? is it international, the answer i got from both
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
. >> is it something that came from the environment or is it concentrated enough to make you lead you to believe they came from the bomb. >> i believe they came from the bomb but i can't be sure. >> how many amputations have you performed and how many are planned? >> if i have my numbers are right, we have performed four amputations and there are two more limbs that are at risk, but i hope that we will save those l legs. [ inaudible question ] yes, they are in intensive care. they are in critical condition. but at this point we have stabilized their vital signs and their hemodynamic situation is under control. >> what are their injuries, can you describe what has placed them in such critical condition? >> most of the injuries were, again, lower extremity major injuries. from these injuries they bled a lot. we controlled the bleeding rather rapidly, but certainly they lost a lot of blood and that created d physiologic problems. [ inaudible question ] as far as i know, all of them are americans. >> can you tell us an age range, doctor, of your patients? >> the younger patient so far was 28 years o
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
whether this came from the environment, right? but it is not. >> i can tell you, as a person who has done trauma surgery, it can be difficult to tell sometimes when you're actually taking some of the shrapnel, wear exactly did it come from. but now they're saying without a doubt, we asked a few times, that there were nails, carpenter nails specifically and, quote, bb-like metal within some of these patients. and so they -- they know for sure it came from the explosive device. this is a doctor saying that based on their medical examination. this wasn't just debris that was lying around. >> what about also quickly in terms of the amputations, i was hearing one of the doctors saying last night, some of the patients were coming to them very injured, bleeding and saying, take whatever you need, i want to be alive. that has to be tough for a doctor, though. >> these are i think heart breaking decisions. it is a -- you can make the decision fairly quickly if that's going to be the best course of action. >> life or death. >> if you don't do the amputation, sometimes it can mean infection, that ca
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
and energy activity in hat fast-changing environment. congress should ensure that the coast guard has the tools they need to do all we ask them to do. while our nation struggles with finding a responsible balance of fiscal restraint with a budget that meets our needs and responsibilities, i'm concerned about the nearly $1 billion reduction proposed in the coast guard fiscal year 2014 budget. last year we passed an authorization bill for the coast guard that authorized over $17 million more than the president's request would provide. it represented a
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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